Category: Medical Malpractice Articles

Medial Malpractice Blog Home

Nov

2017

Heart Stents Often Unnecessary

Whether stents are necessary matters greatly because any surgery, particularly on the heart, carries significant risks, including death. Therefore, if studies do not demonstrate a proven benefit for stenting single-vessel disease, it no longer appears acceptable for a physician to simply tell a patient they “need a stent” because of one blocked vessel.

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Nov

2017

Top Urologist Investigated for Double Booking and Overcharging

In September we blogged about allegations against one of Lennox Hill Hospital’s prominent urologists, Dr. David Samadi – chairman of the department – who allegedly double-booked surgeries, that is, booked more than one operation at the same time, even though he had told his patients that he would be their surgeon.

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Nov

2017

The Opioid Epidemic and Over Prescription

They are often appropriately involved with patients who have an ongoing need of significant pain control. It is our belief that patients would benefit more from being referred to pain management specialists when they have significant ongoing pain-control needs than given more medication.

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Nov

2017

Physician Burnout is a Danger to Patients

A significant percentage of physicians are burned out or otherwise unable to provide the best medical care available to patients. This, of course, puts patients in jeopardy and leads to errors that could result in strong medical malpractice suits.

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Oct

2017

Proving Pain and Suffering in a Negligence Case

Sometimes the most significant part of a legal award is for “pain and suffering.” We all understand the concept of pain, and we all understand the word “suffering,” but the legal meaning of “pain and suffering” as a legal basis for compensation is often misunderstood by those who are not attorneys.

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Oct

2017

Future Consequences of the Immediate Injury

Traumatic injury to a joint may very well be exhibiting signs of arthritis in later years. Depending on the joint involved and the specific injury, surgery can sometimes bring about temporary relief, but surgery can also bring with it additional complications.

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Sep

2017

Dog Bite and Many Medical Errors Nearly Cause Patient’s Death

Not every case in which a doctor “did something wrong” results in a medical malpractice case. Sometimes there is fault on the part of the doctor and the patient. Depending on the circumstances, a case may still be brought.

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Sep

2017

“My Doctor Made Me an Addict.” Can I Sue?

The epidemic rise of opioid addiction is a national problem that has a strong presence in the media today. Suits have been filed by states and other entities against pharmaceutical companies, alleging they have misrepresented the risks of addiction for their medications. These suits are still in their inception, and their future viability remains to be seen.

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Sep

2017

Birth-Related Brain Damage in Newborns

Some of the most serious medical malpractice cases our firm has handled are those in which newborns suffer a lack of oxygen during the labor and delivery process because of negligent management.

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Sep

2017

Who Really Did Your Surgery?

Like any good idea, training new doctors by allowing them hands-on experience can be pushed beyond its reasonable limits. Recently, medical malpractice claims displayed the practice of surgeons delegating too much surgery or sometimes even entire surgeries to inexperienced residents been brought into the spotlight

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